Designing the Ebenezer Project

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The Ebenezer project.  It’s probably the most complicated, and the most beautiful lace I’ve ever made.  It also has a lot of meaning to me.  The four blossoms in the center of each motif are for my children, and the path that brought them to me.

The blossoms are Linnaea Borealis (twinflower) blossoms, named by Carl Linnaeus.  They are tiny white and pink ground flowers that grow in alpine areas.  Carl Linnaeus often had his portrait painted with a sprig of Linnaea Borealis somewhere in the painting.  It is a symbol of humility because of the quiet unassuming way it grows along the ground.  As I designed this lace for the Los Angeles Temple, I thought a lot about my life, and the blessings I’ve had.  This lace symbolizes those blessings, and the path that got me through some of the hardest things of my life.

It is my second altar cloth for the Los Angeles temple, but the first that I designed myself, based loosely on a vintage pattern called “Valentine”.  It took me four months to complete, working sometimes 8 hours a day.  It’s truly a labor of love, and a gift from me to the Lord.

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Ebenezer Lace Corner Detail

 

IMG_20140403_120412568This is the corner detail of my Ebenezer Lace project. It is an original design, in size 40 thread. I worked the border blossoms with the roll stitch across the center of each blossom, and clones knots sprinkled throughout like baby’s breath.

The roll stitch is famous in my husband’s family because his grandmother Lillie Lang Robison used it extensively in her original lace designs that were passed to her posterity.

The clones knots are to honor my grandma Celinda Jane Olson’s Irish heritage. She was the first lacemaker I knew in my line.

These heavier stitches and knots also serve to weigh the border down a bit as the lace hangs over the altar.  The thread weight is so light, I didn’t want it to curl.

 

Reviving a Lost Art

IMG_20140408_163933“I consider lace to be one of the prettiest imitations ever made of the fantasy of nature; lace always evokes for me those incomparable designs which the branches and leaves of trees embroider across the sky, and I do not think that any invention of the human spirit could have a more graceful or precise origin.”
–Coco Chanel, April 29, 1939