New Pattern: The Little Light of Hope

This is a new pattern I’ve been designing.  I worked on it through Conference weekend, and it is turning out just beautifully.  I’m including the pattern below.  The motif is a flicker of light with twelve repetitions radiating around.  12 hours in each turn of the clock, 12 months in a year.

As I was listening to conference, working and reworking this motif, I heard these words quoted in one of the talks, and felt it fit:

“That which is of God is light; and he that receiveth light, and continueth in God, receiveth more light; and that light groweth brighter and brighter until the perfect day.”  —Doctrine and Covenants 50:24

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 Light of Hope Motif Pattern

This lace is being made in Turkish thread size 60 which roughly translates to size 30 in the United States.  I’m using a size 21 Tulip brand hook (equal to size 14 Boye hook).  Other thread sizes and hook sizes may be used as appropriate.

Row 1:  Chain 8, join in a ring

Row 2:  12 sc in ring, join with sl st

Row 3:  Ch 7, acts as first triple and first ch3 sp,  (tr, ch3) in each sc of previous row.  Join with sl st to 4th ch of beginning ch7.  (12 tr, 12 sp made)

Row 4:  Ch 1, 4sc in each ch 3 sp around.  Join with sl st

Row 5:  Ch 5, acts as first triple of the 5tr cluster.  Work one tr in the tr of previous row and next three sc, and next tr, saving the last loop of each tr on hook, draw one loop through all loops on hook.  5tr cluster made.  Cluster, ch7, repeat around.  (Twelve clusters made)

Row 6:   Sl st in next two ch, ch 4, acts as first triple, 3tr, ch2, 3tr, ch 5 in each ch7 loop of the previous row. Join with sl st to top of first tr.  (Twelve groups and twelve ch5 sp made)

Row 7:  Ch 8, p in 3rd ch from hook, counts as first dtr, dtr, p, tr, p, in the ch2 sp of previous row. ch2, 2sc in ch5 sp of previous row, *ch2, tr, p, dtr, p, dtr, p, dtr, p, tr, p, in next ch2 sp, ch2, 2sc in next ch5 sp* repeat around, tr, dtr in first space, join with sl st to the top of the first dtr made.

Row 8:  sl st through p of previous row, ch 6, dtr in 2nd sc of previous row, ch 6, 2sc in top of middle p of next group, repeat around.  Sl to join.

Row 9:  Sl st in next ch, ch 4, counts as first dc and ch1. *Dc, ch1, four times in each ch6 loop around. Join with sl in the  3rd ch of beginning stitch to join.

Row 10, Irish Edging– (2sc in every sp, p over gap between 4dc, ch1 group ) twice, 2sc in next sp, 1sc in next sp, ch 10, flip work and 2sc in the middle of the 4dc, ch1 group just covered with scs.  Flip work again.  Cover ch10 with 9sc, p, 9sc. Place one more sc in the ch 1 space  before ch10 adventure began.  Repeat around, close with sl.

1st motif made.

“Wherefore, ye must press forward with a steadfastness in Christ, having a perfect brightness of hope, and a love of God and of all men. Wherefore, if ye shall press forward, feasting upon the word of Christ, and endure to the end, behold, thus saith the Father: Ye shall have eternal life.”  –2Nephi 31:20

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Wings to Fly With

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I came across this quote this morning and have been pondering it.

“Do not ask your children
to strive for extraordinary lives.
Such striving may seem admirable,
but it is the way of foolishness.
Help them instead to find the wonder
and the marvel of an ordinary life.
Show them the joy of tasting
tomatoes, apples and pears.
Show them how to cry
when pets and people die.
Show them the infinite pleasure
in the touch of a hand.
And make the ordinary come alive for them.
The extraordinary will take care of itself.”  

– William Martin 

Yesterday the kids and I went to the stables where my daughter works with a few horses on a volunteer basis. She spent a good chunk of this summer training with my sister. For her, horses are freedom.

My two littlest kids love “the horse place”. They watched the goats, climbed on the rocks and had more fun in the dirt and sticks than you’d think possible.

The other day I had the joy of watching a child who is dear to us as he struggled to smile. It’s an effort that for most is simple, but for him has been a journey fit for a novel.

There is something true in the healing, nurturing power of simple things. All of us have a little trauma to overcome in  some degree or another. That’s the nature of life in this imperfect space. It’s the simple things that give us wings. Flight is in our nature. Being who we are, we can’t help but fly.

And that, is extraordinary.

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Birds in Flight – – Altar cloth lace in progress

Heritage of Lace and Faith

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These are my great great grandparents, Charles Fredrick and Celinda Jane Twitchell Olson.  Celinda is my grandmother who made lace and helped inspire me to do so also. She lived until she was 103.  Her life overlapped mine by one glorious year.  My daughter, Anna Celinda, is named for her.

Celinda and Charles were faithful members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and left their posterity a great heritage of lace, and faith.