Cluny Six Petal Join Technique Pattern

IMG_20170425_183736822_HDR.jpg

To join two “Little Light of Hope” motifs together, I use the cluny six petal join technique.  The join isn’t difficult but it’s rated advanced because it’s tricky to learn where the petals attach unless you’re sitting right next to someone teaching you.  I’m going to write the pattern with lots of pictures detailing each step.

The join is made as you’re going around the last row, row 10.  This is the pattern without any joining:

Row 10, Irish Edging– (2sc in every sp, p over gap between 4dc, ch1 group ) twice, 2sc in next sp, 1sc in next sp, ch 10, flip work and 2sc in the middle of the 4dc, ch1 group just covered with scs.  Flip work again.  Cover ch10 with 9sc, p, 9sc. Place one more sc in the ch 1 space  before ch10 adventure began.  Repeat around, close with sl.

This is the pattern for Row 10 with a Triple Cluny Six Petal Join:

Row 10, tr six petal join– (2sc in every sp, p over gap between 4dc, ch1 group) twice, 2sc in next sp, 1sc in next sp, ch 10, flip work and 2sc in the middle of the 4dc, ch1 group just covered with scs.  Flip work again.  Cover ch10 with 8 sc. Chain 1 for joining picot, 2sc in top of picot of new motif. 1sc across the middle of the two joined picots for strength.  8sc in remainder of ch10 loop.  2sc in each ch1 gap, ch4 picot over dtr of previous row, twice.  2sc in next sp, 1sc in next sp, ch 10, flip work and 2sc in middle of the 4dc, ch1 group just covered with scs.  Flip work again. (see picture above for illustration of this step) Cover ch 10 with FOUR sc, begin triple cluny six petal join.

IMG_20170425_184004017_HDR.jpg

Six petal join– Chain 5, 3tr in top of last sc made keeping last loop of each tr on hook.  Slip one loop through all four loops on hook.  Beginning cluny cluster made.

IMG_20170425_184104909_HDR.jpg

For the second petal, find the fourth sc up on the left side of the next ch10 loop of previous motif (telling where to place these petals in words is what makes writing this pattern out difficult… here’s a picture) 5tr in the fourth sc of left side of ch10 loop, keeping the last loop of each tr on hook, draw one loop through all five loops, sc across the top of the petal for stability and to pull the top of the petal even closer together. 2nd cluny petal made.

IMG_20170425_184216661_HDR.jpg

Third petal placement– the petals are placed in a clockwise fashion in the gap between the two joins already made between motifs.  Place third petal in the top of the picot that follows clockwise after petal two.  Sc across the top of completed petal.

IMG_20170425_184346599.jpg

Fourth petal placement– count four sc up on the previous ch10 loop, place fourth petal in fourth sc up.  Sc across the top of petal made.

IMG_20170425_184459445.jpg

Fifth petal–  place fifth petal four sc up from the base of the second to last ch10 loop on the motif you’re currently working on. Sc across the top to secure.

IMG_20170425_184616425.jpg

Sixth petal– place sixth petal in the picot between ch10 loops of the motif you are currently working on. Sc across the top to secure.

IMG_20170425_184733041_HDR.jpg

Finishing off first petal– sc across the top of the first petal. Slip crochet hook through the tops of all the tr of that petal, sc to secure. Chain five.  Slip crochet hook into the sc at the base of petal 1, yarn over, slip crochet hook behind base of petal 1, yarn over again, sc to secure.  Flower complete.  4sc in ch10 loop.  Picot join to second motif.  Triple cluny six petal join complete.

IMG_20170425_185055757_HDR.jpg

The larger gaps between these motifs calls for a Double Triple Cluny Six Petal Join.  This join makes a slightly larger flower to cover the gap.

8sc in ch10 loop to finish loop.  2sc in each ch1 gap, ch4 picot over dtr of previous row, twice.  2sc in next sp, 1sc in next sp, ch 10, flip work and 2sc in middle of the 4dc, ch1 group just covered with scs.  Flip work again. Cover ch 10 with FOUR sc, begin Double Triple Cluny Six Petal Join.

First DTR petal– Chain six.  Five dtr in sc just made, keeping last loop of each dtr on hook.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all five loops.  Beginning DTR petal made.

IMG_20170425_185339426_HDR.jpg

Second DTR petal– Six DTR in fourth sc of ch10 loop of second joining motif.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all six loops. Sc across the top of the petal to secure.  Second petal made.

IMG_20170425_185519089_HDR.jpg

Third DTR petal– Going clockwise, place six DTR in fourth sc of next ch10 loop of second joining motif.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all six loops. Sc across the top of the petal to secure.  Third petal made.

IMG_20170425_185706360_HDR.jpg

Fourth DTR petal– Going clockwise, place six DTR in fourth sc of next ch10 loop of first joining motif.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all six loops. Sc across the top of the petal to secure.  Fourth petal made.

IMG_20170425_185931946_HDR.jpg

Fifth DTR petal– Going clockwise, place six DTR in fourth sc of next ch10 loop of first joining motif.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all six loops. Sc across the top of the petal to secure.  Fifth petal made.

IMG_20170425_190056010_HDR.jpg

Sixth DTR petal– Going clockwise, place six DTR in fourth sc of next ch10 loop of the motif you are currently working on.  Yarn over, pull one loop through all six loops. Sc across the top of the petal to secure.  Sixth petal made.

IMG_20170425_190224563_HDR.jpg

Finishing off first DTR petal– sc across the top of the first petal. Slip crochet hook through the tops of all the dtr of that petal, sc to secure. Chain sic.  Slip crochet hook into the sc at the base of petal 1, yarn over, slip crochet hook behind base of petal 1, yarn over again, sc to secure.  Flower complete.  4sc in ch10 loop.  Picot join to third motif.  Double Triple Cluny Six Petal Join complete.

IMG_20170425_190436933_HDR.jpg

The TR and DTR six petal joins alternate. If I were to continue joining this motif to the lace fabric, I would join next with the smaller TR six petal join, followed by a DTR six petal join and finally a TR six petal join. Depending on how many motifs you are joining, you may or may not have this many petal joins to make. As you get more practice, you’ll be able to see which flower goes where in the pattern.

For additional help, my dear husband helped me film one of the cluny joins in progress:

Advertisements

Birds in Flight: From Chicken Scratch to Fruition

ImageI’ve been working on this design for several weeks now. I am really pleased with it. I’ve just had the design cleared to be used for an altar cloth in the Los Angeles temple. Progress!

There are few things as rewarding as sheer creation. It must be human nature, the bit of God in embryo in all of us.

This one is for my children. They all are. Each lace tells a story.  “Birds in Flight” is the next chapter in the story of our lives and our walk with the Lord. So much heartache brought each of our children to us. Each of them is learning to fly.  Free.  Safe.  It is joy to me. So many miracles.

Six Pointed Lace Motif

I’m experimenting with lace design. This original creation is my newest try. I’m looking for a good design for my next altar cloth project.

Altar cloth patterns need to be close woven designs so buttons don’t snag on them, but they still want them open enough to be lacy and beautiful. It is a constant tug of war between beauty and durability.

So far, I like it. I don’t know if it’s the one though.

This six pointed lace motif was worked in size 20 thread. Not bad for a Sunday afternoon.

Image

A Work in Progress: Heather’s Star Motif Altar Cloth Lace

Heather's Altar Lace

Star Motif Altar Cloth Lace Section

When I began working with the Los Angeles Temple, the Temple Matron and I had quite a few questions about what kinds of laces and designs were acceptable for altar cloths, since we were both unfamiliar with the new guidelines. We ended up talking with Salt Lake several times.

When the Temple Department found out I was making new laces, they told me there was an urgent need for an altar lace in the Denver Temple, and wondered if I could help. I already had a lace I was working on for the Los Angeles Temple so I couldn’t help with Denver, but I knew someone who could.

I gave them the contact information for my mother-in-law and sister-in-law, Mary and Heather Rockwood. They are also lacemakers, and they both happen to live in Colorado, just south of Denver.

It turned out that even though Heather has never made altar lace before, she was already working on an altar lace for them… the temple in Denver just didn’t know it yet.  Slow and steady, she already had quite a few inches of her lace completed. How is that for being inspired? They were so pleased.

I asked Heather what pattern she was using, and she sent me this photograph of her lace in progress.  It’s simple and beautiful. Her pattern is called “Star Motif” from an old needlework magazine called “Workbasket”.

TheStarMotifRunner_small
Mary has also started working on an altar lace for the Denver Temple. This will be her second altar lace. I wrote a post about her first lace for Denver Temple that she made several years ago.

Her new altar cloth is going to be the sister lace to my Ebenezer Lace. I taught Mary the pattern when she visited me a month or two ago, and she decided to make hers to match.

So, when they are finished, Denver will have two new laces, instead of one!